Indiana Jones round-up

The House Next Door: Smitten With a Whip: Three Appreciations of Indiana Jones
What are we looking at? Is this an unseen spectator’s fantasy? Willie’s grandiose daydream? An alternate reality? It’s no real-world nightclub routine, that’s for sure. What stage director in his right mind would choreograph a dance routine in a style that’s not theatrical but cinematic (the dancers obviously arranged for an unseen movie camera’s benefit), and stage it in a room that the club’s patrons can’t even see? Anything goes, indeed.

The House Next Door: Migration and Exodus: Indiana Jones
Was a time when Spielberg might have had Indy rising into frame full-face and body, the blast behind him merely a source of Slocombe-superintended backlight. But here, in concert with his visual Herrmann—from Schindler’s List on—Janusz Kaminski, he makes sure to dwarf Indy, obliterating him (as per the final sequence of Last Crusade) into silhouette, forcing character and audience alike to bear witness to the glory and the horror, to reconcile the realities of mankind with its no less tangible myths.

BLDGBLOG: Inside the Test Village

Edward Copeland on Film: Indy in Peril: An Action-Scene Breakdown

Temple of Doom: Bang a gong, sing a song
“Indiana Jones and the Temple of Doom” tells you how to watch it in the first shot. This time the twin peak is revealed to be embossed on a gong — which establishes the retro-1930s “Oriental”-exoticism theme of the adventure, and kicks off Kate Capshaw’s Cantonese “Anything Goes” musical number with a bang, beginning with the extended take that immediately follows. For movie fans of all ages, this gong instantly evokes fond, resonant memories…

New York Press – ARMOND WHITE – Another Indy Classic
When the impudent, postmodern imperialism of Raiders was followed by the comic essay on the morality of speed in 1984’s Temple of Doom, both needed some crucial political correction—eventually provided by The Last Crusade’s overview of Western political and religious heritage.

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